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20121202
20121210
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CNNW 4
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
of this world. right now nasa is revealing the latest discovery on mars. ready in welcome to brand-new hour of "happening now," i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. uncovering new knowledge about the red planet. today's announcement comes nearly four months after the six-wheeled robot landed in a giant crater. nasa unveiling the latest findings today as a gathering of scientists around the world come together. claudia cowen joins us by phone. >> reporter: this would be a game change err but most likely not. this may be a little overhyped after one scientist said that the data would be one for the record books. that was tweeted by curiosity itself through a twitter account run by nasa's jet propulsion lab. for the past few weeks nasa has had to real in expectations issuing a press release saying today's news quote will be the update about the first use of the rove verse full array of analytical instruments to inspect a drift of sandy soil. some say they may have uncovered methane, and that aliens may have been decomposing. the rover is working to identify organic compounds to see if mars can
-- >> although our president did not encourage it. >> nasa has just released photos of earth that put the planet in a whole new light. the pictures are actually nine shots from a satellite that cut through clouds with the help of infrared technology. >> the nighttime pictures have a much higher resolution than previous such images. the quality is so good that the satellite can even pick up the light from ships as it does here on the river nile. the satellite images also show where on the planned it is still trul dark at night. >> they do not have snow in washington yet like we have here in berlin to get into the christmas selling. >> but as the holidays draw closer, u.s. president barack obama and his family have lit the national christmas tree outside the white house. >> it is an annual tradition dating back to 1923. this year's giant blue spruce is new and will remain planted outside the white house throughout the year. the tree is lit by 450 strands of alley delights and 120 star ornaments. >> that looks like a fun party. >> beautiful christmas in the white house for sure. that is all we have
shots. a nasa scientist recently told a reporter the mars rover has dug up something for the history bks. turns out nasa's history books have exceedingly dull. today, scientists released the results from a first test of the martian soil and no real surprises. the rover found water and some simple carbon moleculars but not the complex carbon that experts consider essential for life. and no sign of aliens. they are probably hiding. one of college football's most prestigious honor could say go to a freshman for the first time. could. the heisman finalists? we have them for you next. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for ily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pa
. >> reporter: from a nasa camera it looked like a bright light above the earth. that's the view from space. these are from eyewitness viewers around houston just as day was breaking. a bright flash of light some people first thought was lightning. >> i guessed it was going to rain. >> reporter: it wasn't the weather. this map just a sampling of sightings in the houston area. and these are some of the pictures september to abc13.com. showing a small area of colored light, others showing a trail behind it. people have been talking about it all day. >> like a ufo taking a picture of the sky, like a big flash. >> a co-worker started talking about, did you hear about the flash this morning? i'm like, flash? should i be concerned? >> reporter: at the houston museum of natural science, not concern but a lot of curiosity. >> yeah, it was going so fast, it actually gets through the atmosphere, that makes the flow. >> reporter: the museum's astronomer suspects it's a meteorite, a small piece of rock burning through space. fit meets the criteria. >> did it make a trail? did it actually move? did it c
of the state of israel to move forward to its nasa is but he has to answer this question and i'm afraid that his answered is not appropriate or is not acceptable and not practical. >> rose: his answer is what? >> his answer is that, you know, let's sit down and negotiate without any pre-conditions. which is a wonderful slogan. i'm entirely for it. but at the same time if he continues building thousands of units in the territory which is will have to be located -- >> rose: and with a full understanding that it makes the ultimate solution much more difficult >> it will make it much more difficult. it will not only make a solution much more difficult, it will not allow the beginning of negotiations in good faith because what the palestinians say is how can we seriously trust that the other side means to reach an agreement if they do the opposite of what can make an agreement possible. that's what they say and the actions on ground somehow support it. and i know that netanyahu wants peace and he wants the best peace for israel and he wants a peace that would guarantee the security of the st
ending the war on drugs. sxwlirchlgts how nasa is protecting astronauts from radiation in space and how florians can actually cash in on invading pythons. we'll get right in. a job market being painted today. it's a picture that really is surprising a lot of folks. the labor department says that 146,000 jobs were added in november. that is almost double the 77,000 that economists were actually expecting. unemployment fell to 7.7%. that is the lowest level in nearly four years. christine romans is breaking it down. >> by now you've seen the headline, a stronger than expected jobs report for the month of november. let's look inside those numbers. you've got 40% of the unemployed have been out of work for six months or longer. that's called long-term unemployment. still something we got to work on. we need to get better next year. the underemployment rate 14.4%. those are the number of people who are out of work or are working part-time, but would like to be working full-time. people who are not fully, fully employed in the labor market. 14.4%. sometimes that's also called the real unemplo
of the ooeearth at night. nasa unveiled these images today. the lights indicate the most populated parts of the world. they're just really beautiful. just like at that one, wolf. it's really beautiful. >> i love these nighttime pictures of earth. >> nasa provides some pretty cool stuff. >> a lot more lights on the east coast. >> densely populated and darker. making this up. >> thank you. meanwhile, authorities in nebraska didn't have much trouble tracking down an alleged bank robber and thanks to the suspect, prosecutors shouldn't have a hard time making their case. jeanne moos shows us why. >> note to accused bank robbers. doesn't help your case to post yourself on youtube waving around cash and holing a sign saying i robbed a bank. while the band green day blares appropriate lyrics. ♪ and you might want to reconsider titling your video chick bank robber. 19-year-old hannah sabata was arrested one day after. corner stone bank in nebraska was robbed. according to sheriff dale radcliffe, who had to keep a grip on her as she jerk ed away -- the suspect seems to like writing notes. like t
at the joint press conference that nasa was carrying out in houston and moscow because it will, as you mentioned, be american scott kelly and the russian mikha mikhail kornienko. and this is a huge, huge first step. you can't underestimate it. if eventually there is going to be long duration flights to an astroid or on to mars, you not only have to have an understanding of the technical issues that you might face but what the body will go through over a course of year or two years in space. there just isn't enough of a baseline of information right now. so this is going to be hugely important. because, for instance, blood pressure goes down when you're on a long duration mission. you lose a lot of body mass and bone mass and muscle mass. the eyes change. there's an eye loss issue. eyesight loss issue that astronauts are facing coming back even from the duration of space flights they are doing now on the international space station. so a lot you have to understand about how the body is affected by weightlessness and also behavioral issues. if you and i go on this two-year mission, are w
. scientists want to analyze how the human body reacts to long-term exposure in orbit. this is part of nasa's larger plan to one day send man to mars but the journey, get this, takes eight months one way. so they must understand how the body reacts to those conditions. researchers already know it can affect eyesight. >> we discovered that some crewmembers are having some pressure in their intracain ya'll pressure, pressure in the vain system in their brains and spinal cord especially. that was causing in some crewmembers a vision impact. >> reporter: training for this mission starts early next year with the official launch date in the spring of 2015. jenna. jenna: pretty remarkable. when you think about the story, you wonder why can't we do the fiscal cliff thing? >> reporter: right. jenna: if we can put somebody in space for a year. >> reporter: we need to ask our lawmakers, right. jenna: casey, incredible story. gregg: you can put the man on the moon but you can't --. all right. researchers may have found what could be the earliest known dinosaur to walk the earth. the mysterious fossil f
. it looks even better in hd. they didn't have that 40 years ago, did they. captain gene cernan former nasa astronaut with us now. n her, il by the way is hosting this. traveled all over the country to conduct these interviews. it's great to have you. gene, i just want you to tell our audience, if you can, what you want them to understand about what was done then, four decades ago. >> all right. you know, this -- today, as a matter of fact, bill, is the launch date 40 years ago, and in a week it will be 40 years since those final steps, and what i really want to have happen, we've got almost two full generation, a half of seven tour reef young men and young women in a country today who neither weren't born when neil walked on the moon or diapers or knee pants when i made the last steps. i want to remind them what happened in this country from alan shepard's first steps into space when actually i look them as the first steps on the moon when we didn't even know we were going, and what it took this country, the dead today indication, the commitment of hundreds of thousands of people in this c
at night revealing a planet that is really never in the dark. nasa releasing these pictures that were taken not by me, but by a special satellite called sumy npp. we're about to show you the united states, you can see it coming into frame, and you can see how the lights illuminating from the ground look a lot like the stars and the constellations we see when we look up at night. and here's a bird's eye view of egypt's nile river lit up by boats. yes, those are lights from boats. the reason these images are possible is because of a new sensor that is onboard the camera which stands for the national polar orbiting partnership. it was launched last year. it gives scientists -- and us -- a brand new way to observe what our planet looks like once the sun goes down. what do you think of that, jon? jon: that's cool. and atlanta really stands out in the shot of the sort of, you know, eastern seaboard. i don't know, it's kind of interesting. i was surprised that atlanta is so big and bright. >> reporter: atlanta and, of course, the northeast. and you can see there that sort of corridor up in new yor
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)